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K&N Vs Aem

Looking for an air intake, but not sure which one to get...or does it really matter? If you believe all three will improve engine sound similarly, please let me know since the K&N one is less expensive and simpler to get for me. Who really employs one of these? Which one would you suggest, and why? Looking for simple installation and fantastic sound...all...wonderful that's sound. Thanks! AEMK&NTakeda

I apologies if these questions have already been addressed. I looked, but I didn't find many good solutions to my questions. To be quite honest, I don't know anything about vehicles. I made a few aesthetic modifications to the exterior of my vehicle, but I'd want to learn how to modify it, and I've heard that the intake is an excellent place to start. I now own a 2007 LS Coupe that is completely stock.

Having saying that, the new AEM dryflow Red media was created in partnership with K&N and will most likely flow better than grey media. If you do not want an oiled system, I would recommend the AEM red dryflow. Some users have reported problems with overheating K&N filters and MAF sensors. My 2009 CRV has a MAF sensor, and I've never had any issues with a K&N filter. My 2004 Elantra has a MAF sensor, and I had no issues with an AEM.

gts rosh stated: The main difference between the new AEM Dry Flow and the old K&N is that there are no oils on the filter element, and oil is an excellent repellent to water. As a result, the AEM Dry Flow will most likely let more water into your CAI. Click to enlarge... This is what I was always concerned about when this was released. These new filters are designed to let more air in, but at what cost? I'm not going to risk allowing more water in simply to have a little greater air flow rate. Our autos already have a high risk of hydrolock "if you're not attentive." The oils in the K&N filters may help block out more water and so be safer, but it's difficult to tell since no one here has used one for a long length of time or seen any difficulties.

K&N Vs Aem Air Filter

The major rationale for purchasing one of these is that it is reusable, allowing you to simply clean, re-oil, and install...... I bought one for my car just for this purpose. I'm sure I'll replace more than four air filters in this car's lifespan since I keep my cars for over 400,000 kilometers......... In the end, it's a cost-effective and convenient improvement.

In the end, you must pick which choice is best for you. Consider the benefits and drawbacks of each kit when deciding between a Spectre cold air intake and a K&N device. We think that no matter whatever brand you pick, you will not be unhappy with your purchase. Both businesses provide high-quality cold air intake systems for a wide range of automobiles. You should have no trouble finding a suitable choice for your vehicle!

Capacity and Efficiency:The Capacity and Efficiency test report gives the results of feeding an originally clean filter at a constant rate and airflow with PTI Course Test Dust (dirt). The particle sizes in the course test dust range from less than 2.5 microns to higher than 80 microns (see table below).

gts rosh stated: The main difference between the new AEM Dry Flow and the old K&N is that there are no oils on the filter element, and oil is an excellent repellent to water. As a result, the AEM Dry Flow will most likely let more water into your CAI. Click to enlarge... This is what I was always concerned about when this was released. These new filters are designed to let more air in, but at what cost? I'm not going to risk allowing more water in simply to have a little greater air flow rate. Our autos already have a high risk of hydrolock "if you're not attentive." The oils in the K&N filters may help block out more water and so be safer, but it's difficult to tell since no one here has used one for a long length of time or seen any difficulties.

K&N Vs Aem Dryflow

As for heat soak, I don't have a problem with that. When I opened the hood after a lengthy time of driving, the intake and filter were both cold to the touch...the heat shield, not so much. It has a quiet sound until you strike it. I know a lot of folks here despise aftermarket intakes (my assumption is they have unrealistic expectations), but I adore them! On Amazon, it didn't even cost me $150. The folks at AEM know what they're doing since they've been doing it for 25 years...AFE (which I appreciate, don't get me wrong) has only been around for about 10 years and is more expensive.

Do you need a new Dryflow air filter for your AEM intake? Do you need a high-flow air filter for your non-AEM intake? We have AEM filters in 2.5" and 3.0" sizes. The sizes of popular AEM intakes are listed below. Please measure your intake if you do not have an AEM intake before buying one of these replacement filters.

dedonderosa first posted I'm searching for a replacement filter for my S2000's K&N fipk intake and wanted to know whether a dry flow filter is much more restrictive than the kn filter. I know it has superior filtering media than the kn, however I was curious about the air flow. Will you continue to utilize the FIPK intake pipe? If this is the case, get the biggest Dry Flow that will fit; if the D/F is a bit more restricted, the additional 2" to 4" in length will more than compensate for the increased restriction (and far superior filtration) that the KN filter provides. I have an S2000 as well, and I removed the divider in the factory air box and now use a filter that is almost twice as long as the original cone filter. If I had a FIPK, I would also apply an over length filter on it. ROD p.s. My air filter has 90k miles on it and I am only getting 8 "This spring, the filter will be changed due to water limitation (with photos)

I "I'm hesitant to buy another aftermarket filter, but what is the best one that won't take low-end torque and fling it at high-end torque? I'd like a dry panel element for ease of cleaning. Are oiled products better because they flow and filter better? I simply want a nice filter that feels like the OEM filter and filters well. My alternatives are AEM, Airraid, and AFE. Anyone have an opinion on the three? I'm sure they're all good, but I want to do it right this time.

K&N Vs Aem Drop In Filter

Having saying that, the new AEM dryflow Red media was created in partnership with K&N and will most likely flow better than grey media. If you do not want an oiled system, I would recommend the AEM red dryflow. Some users have reported problems with overheating K&N filters and MAF sensors. My 2009 CRV has a MAF sensor, and I've never had any issues with a K&N filter. My 2004 Elantra has a MAF sensor, and I had no issues with an AEM.

This is my first encounter with the term "Green." K&N has always performed well for me in the past. In the last ten years, filter technology has advanced by leaps and bounds. Use the oil sparingly and you'll be OK. The K&N will perform an excellent job while also helping the environment by avoiding the use of paper filters in landfills.

It makes no difference that it is 2.0. I'm not saying the original airbox is a CAI. If the 2.0T is like the 3.8, it has a plastic snorkel-like device above the radiator that snakes around to the drop-in filter-box. While it is distinct, I would not classify it as a true CAI. The fog vent cut out allows direct high pressure air into a large pocket produced by the plastic wheel well liner and floor liner trim attached onto the front bumper. From its entrance route to this cavern, the real air-fitler unit with its Velocity stak actually faces downward. It is not a direct result of anything. It does, however, benefit from all of the ambient air that has never been exposed to engine heat. (This is in contrast to the OEM snorkle assembly.) Water is not a problem since there are molded drain ports in the underbody liner. I do have a trans-cooler/fan element on the driver side fog vent that I removed as well. It is placed directly in the path of the vent air flow.

If you use too much oil, oil and trapped dirt will fall off the filter material and into the engine. The oil is harmful to the MAF sensor, and the filth is definitely harmful to the engine. If there is insufficient oil, the filter will not filter adequately, enabling debris to flow through the dry areas of the filter. Furthermore, the oil is the principal "filtration medium" in a K&N oiled gauze filter (or similar filters from other sources). The cotton gauze's primary role is to keep the oil in the air flow. The dirt is captured by the oil. They are much more efficient than many internet critics would accept. "It's like trying to keep flies out with a chain link fence," the uninformed will remark. That is not how those filters operate. To use a similar comparison, it's like attempting to keep flies out with 20 chain link fences stacked on top of each other, with the wires covered with a "super glue" that smells/tastes like honey and spreads over and encases the flies when they contact it, turning the caught flies into filter material. Click to enlarge...

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